Collaborators

My research program would not be possible without the tremendous support and assistance of so many people, from other scientists, students, wildlife and forestry government officials, non-governmental organization staff, and rural community residents around the world, to partnering state agency staff here at home in North Carolina. I am extremely grateful to all of them. Here are a few examples of the many people with whom I am currently collaborating, in alphabetical order.

Anchalee Aowphol is a Lecturer in the Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University in Bangkok, Thailand, where she leads the Amphibian and Reptile Research Laboratory. Long-time friends since graduate school, An and I collaborate on numerous projects related to systematics of amphibians and reptiles in Thailand and adjacent areas, and co-mentor students. I also serve as the U.S. Collaborator on her PEER Science grant on capacity building and networking of female herpetologists in the Lower Mekong. Learn more about Dr. Aowphol.

Anchalee Aowphol in the field in Thailand. ©Anchalee Aowphol

David A. Beamer is a Biology Instructor at Nash Community College in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. Dave has great expertise in salamander biodiversity of the Southeast U.S. Through a Research Opportunity Award from the National Science Foundation, we are collaborating on a project to delimit species and resolve evolutionary relationships in several groups of Asian and North American salamanders using next generation sequence data. Learn more about Dr. Beamer.

Dave Beamer searching for salamanders. ©David A. Beamer

Rayna C. Bell is a Research Zoologist and Assistant Curator in the Division of Amphibians & Reptiles at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. We have conducted recent fieldwork together in Gabon, and collaborate on Central African frog systematics and phylogeography. Learn more about Dr. Bell.

Rayna Bell in Gabon with an African Giant Toad. ©Bryan L. Stuart

Huy Duc Hoang is Associate Professor and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Science, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City. Huy, Jodi Rowley and I collaborate on systematics of Vietnamese amphibians and reptiles. I also serve as the U.S. Collaborator on his PEER Science grant on capacity building and networking of female herpetologists in the Lower Mekong. Learn more about Dr. Hoang.

Huy Duc Hoang on the Dalat Plateau, Vietnam. ©Bryan L. Stuart

Thomas B. Lentz is a Teaching Postdoctoral Fellow in the Biotechnology Program at North Carolina State University. We collaborate on analyzing amphibians and reptiles from North Carolina and Central Africa for emerging infectious diseases. Learn more about Dr. Lentz.

Thomas Lentz in the lab. ©Thomas B. Lentz

David S. McLeod is Assistant Professor in Biology at James Madison University and Research Adjunct in the Herpetology Unit at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. We collaborate on systematics of Southeast Asian amphibians, especially fanged frogs (Limnonectes). Learn more about Dr. McLeod.

Dave McLeod with a Fanged Frog in Borneo. ©David S. McLeod

Thy Neang is a Cambodian herpetologist employed by Wild Earth Allies Cambodia Program. We have collaborated for many years on systematics of amphibians and reptiles in Cambodia, and were recently awarded a grant from the National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration to conduct amphibian and reptile surveys in southwestern Cambodia.

Thy Neang and me in northeastern Cambodia. ©Jodi J. L. Rowley

James F. Parham is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences at California State University, Fullerton. We collaborate on reptile systematics, notably turtles. Learn more about Dr. Parham.

Jim Parham conducting field work in the Atacama Desert. ©James F. Parham

Somphouthone Phimmachak is Lecturer in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, National University of Laos, and my former (co-advised) M.Sc. and Ph.D. student. She has terrific expertise in the amphibians and reptiles of Laos, notably salamanders. Somphouthone is in charge of the herpetological natural history collections at the National University of Laos, the only such collections in the country. We continue to collaborate on numerous projects related to the biodiversity and conservation of amphibians and reptiles in Laos.

Somphouthone Phimmachak examining frog specimens from Laos. ©Bryan L. Stuart
Somphouthone Phimmachak showing her appreciation for me in Laos. ©Jennifer Sheridan

Jodi J. L. Rowley is Curator of Amphibian & Reptile Conservation Biology at the Australian Museum. We have conducted fieldwork together in Cambodia and Vietnam, and collaborate primarily on project on systematics and conservation of Indochinese amphibians. Learn more about Dr. Rowley.

Jodi Rowley searching for frogs in Vietnam. ©Bryan L. Stuart

Cameron D. Siler is Assistant Curator of Herpetology at the Sam Noble Museum, University of Oklahoma. We collaborate on Southeast Asian amphibian and reptile systematics, notably in Thailand. Learn more about Dr. Siler.

Cam Siler in the office. ©Cameron D. Siler

Niane Sivongxay is Vice Dean and Lecturer in the Faculty of Natural Sciences, National University of Laos. We have been working together since 2007, conducting fieldwork and co-advising Lao students conducting research on the biodiversity and conservation of amphibians and reptiles in Laos. I also serve as the U.S. Collaborator on her PEER Science grant on capacity building and networking of female herpetologists in the Lower Mekong.

Niane Sivongxay and me in a village in Laos. ©Bryan L. Stuart

Guinevere O. U. Wogan is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. We collaborate on Southeast Asian frog systematics and phylogeography. Learn more about Dr. Wogan.

Guin Wogan and dogs at sunset. ©Guinevere O. U. Wogan.

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